In particular, Web Hosting Hub uses BoldGrid as a site builder. BoldGrid is actually an add-on to WordPress, so there's no lock-in. This overcomes the major problem of most site builders: you're locked into that host and that tool, often requiring you to completely rebuild your site if you want to expand. By using a WordPress-based solution, all of the rather considerable power of WordPress is available for future expansion.


But there's one thing that's the most important for all beginners - customer support. And HostPapa is just brilliant in this field - it has a multilingual 24/7 live chat, phone, and ticket support as well as the most extensive knowledge base possible. So whether you want to chat with someone or solve an issue yourself - HostPapa has all the means for that.
The web hosting provider got bonus points for its policy of performing regular daily backups, even on the lowest-priced shared hosting accounts. Be aware, though, that the promotional price on the low-cost shared hosting does go up after the promotional period. That said, Bluehost offers 24/7 phone support, a 30-day money-back guarantee and SSH access for certain plan options.
Undoubtedly, pricing is the most important factor needing thorough study. Check into the pricing plans for the top-level domains (TLDs) in multiple domain registrars along with contract years, compare and pick the cheap (reasonable) one. Also check the cost of renewal, domain transfer fee, email accounts, WHOIS registration, privacy protection and other additional fees.
No matter what you plan to build, TMDHosting is one of the best web hostings for your personal website. By the way, you sure do need to host your page somewhere to make it appear on the interweb. Instead of searching elsewhere, consider TMDHosting. Not only is it ridiculously cheap, the fully managed hosting rocks the latest technologies for the best performing websites out there. For your information, premium hosting starts at only $2.95 a month.
SiteGround has the best support and good performance but all that comes with a price (high renewal cost). The cheapest plan starts at $3.95/mo (with the 12-month commitment) and renews at $11.95/mo. You can host 1 website and the plan includes 10GB SSD storage, unmetered bandwidth, and free SSL. Your purchase is backed by the 30-day money-back guarantee.
I want to ask I’m a student and we will have an assignment in our school for next half year it’s my last year and this is project will decide my mark (grade). I want to make a blog and I don’t need any top-noch hosting for this. The site is potential going to be shut down after this project. So my question is do you recommend any of the hostings above.

Do you recommend any of those for “testing purposes”? I am looking for a free hosting with a CPanel and easy WordPress installation and management; I fully understand that a testing website is not the same as a productive one but since it would up to the customer to find the best hosting to migrate (though I am helping a little bit on that project) and for my testing purposes paying is not precisely an option since none of those sites is where they would host their site at the end; I am looking for something free but that is good enough for me to work and test and to give a final demo to my customer

Many web hosting services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.

Many web hosting services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
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